New freight train service to relieve truck congestion at Port Botany

Trans Australia (POTA) is putting on an additional train service into Port Botany that is expected to deliver economic improvements to the port-related supply chain and ease congestion and pollution on major roads such as the M5.

The new service runs between Yennora and Port Botany and means POTA will have three daily return services instead of the current two. The new service has been made possible by the addition of a second train-set, which will enable the company to introduce a fourth service when demand justifies it.

POTA estimates the rail service will remove up to 136 truck trips per day off the M5, which will contribute towards meeting the NSW Government’s long term target of 40 per cent rail modal share to and from Port Botany.

POTA Managing Director Paul Digney said the Yennora to Port Botany service will assist in providing a customised rail solution for the Port Botany supply chain.

“The new service will enhance POTA’s existing rail facilities and services and means up to 136 trucks will no longer go through the M5 tunnel,” Mr Digney said.

“In terms of emissions, this single train service is predicted to remove 900,000 kilograms of CO2 emissions in 2010 alone.”

Mr Digney said POTA’s rail expansion will continue throughout 2010. The company expects its rail capacity, including all POTA metro and regional rail services in New South Wales, to exceed 30% of the total Government’s target of 40% of containers on rail.

The NSW Government has recently signed an agreement with the Commonwealth Government-owned Australian Rail Track Corporation to lease the New South Wales interstate track and Hunter Valley rail freight corridors, to attract more freight to rail. The ARTC has recently taken over the Port Botany shunting yards from RailCorp and has made significant infrastructure improvements, enabling trains to be processed more quickly and efficiently in the two terminals.

P&O Trans Australia (POTA) is putting on an additional train service into Port Botany that is expected to deliver economic improvements to the port-related supply chain and ease congestion and pollution on major roads such as the M5. The new service runs between Yennora and Port Botany and means POTA will have three daily return services instead of the current two. The new service has been made possible by the addition of a second train-set, which will enable the company to introduce a fourth service when demand justifies it. POTA estimates the rail service will remove up to 136 truck trips per day off the M5, which will contribute towards meeting the NSW Government’s long term target of 40 per cent rail modal share to and from Port Botany.

POTA Managing Director Paul Digney said the Yennora to Port Botany service will assist in providing a customised rail solution for the Port Botany supply chain. “The new service will enhance POTA’s existing rail facilities and services and means up to 136 trucks will no longer go through the M5 tunnel,” Mr Digney said. “In terms of emissions, this single train service is predicted to remove 900,000 kilograms of CO2 emissions in 2010 alone.” Mr Digney said POTA’s rail expansion will continue throughout 2010.

The company expects its rail capacity, including all POTA metro and regional rail services in New South Wales, to exceed 30% of the total Government’s target of 40% of containers on rail. The NSW Government has recently signed an agreement with the Commonwealth Government-owned Australian Rail Track Corporation to lease the New South Wales interstate track and Hunter Valley rail freight corridors, to attract more freight to rail. The ARTC has recently taken over the Port Botany shunting yards from RailCorp and has made significant infrastructure improvements, enabling trains to be processed more quickly and efficiently in the two terminals.

Source: T and L News